How Mentorship & Creativity Help Neurodiverse People Find Fulfilling Jobs

Unemployment have been holding steady at 3.7% across the country. This environment has led to many employers to think outside of the box to get their positions filled. Some have even gone to a first come, first serve hiring. This rosy picture has been tainted a bit lately with the fact income levels have not been keeping pace.

The economic boom has put millions of people back to work and economists are now saying that Continue reading

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Having a Disability Shouldn’t Mean You Can’t Work

Here are Robert and Matt working on their on-the-job training (OJT) at Daily Bread in Melbourne, FL.

Robert and Matt assembled 35 comfort bags for the folks at Daily Bread in Melbourne, FL as part of their on the job training program. The bags consisted of new socks, shoelaces, combs, toothbrush and toothpaste, water, soup, applesauce, poptarts, gum, razors, lotion, writing pens, notebooks and facial wipes plus a handwritten card. Matt continued the next day Continue reading

Exploring Ways Neurodiverse Students Can Move From College to Work

Neurodiversity is an umbrella term that encompasses a variety of neurological disorders. These neurological disorders include autism, Asperger’s, ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia and tics.

Chris Rogers and Nick Martin are two students who worked this past summer as interns at the City University of New York to develop a neurodiversity hub model. This proposed model is designed to help support young adult students with autism with improving employment outcomes.
Rogers and Martin traveled Continue reading

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Entrepreneurship is Creating Meaningful Jobs for People with Neurodiversity

Samuel Bier at work at Popcorn for the People.
Image Credit: Lara Stolman

Unemployment rate among people with neurodiversity is 80-90%. Most employers constantly pass on employing people with neurodiversity. However, in this tight labor market where there are more jobs than talent, employers are slowly turning the tide and becoming more receptive to people with autism and other disabilities.

That is where the parents of Sam came in. Sam is a high functioning 24-year-old Continue reading

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