Four Ways Employers Can Support Neurodiversity at Work

With unemployment at historic lows, employers for the first time in history, have more jobs to fill than candidates to fill them. As a result, some companies are beginning to open their eyes to an untapped part of the labor market. That is those with neurodiversity.

Neurodiversity is a relatively new umbrella term that encompasses people who have dyslexia, autism, ADHD, dyspraxia and other neurological conditions. These are “spectrum” conditions, with a wide range of Continue reading

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Helping Young Adults with Neurodiversity Reach Their Full Potential

Young adults with neurodiversity, such as these students in a UCLA skills program, are successfully taught social interaction skills.

Some of the world’s most established companies are beginning to tap into the underutilized talent pool of young adults with autism.

Every year, at least 50,000 individuals with neurodiversity will enter adulthood, according to the advocacy organization Autism Speaks. Autism is a disorder that has a wide spectrum, which is why they call it the autism-spectrum Continue reading

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Should You Disclose Your Autism Disorder To Your Employer?

If you have autism, should you disclose that fact when you are interviewing for a job? If you have already been hired without disclosing your disorder, should you tell your boss about it?

For people with autism, deciding to disclose their diagnosis is a tough, personal decision. Autism is a disorder that is covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This law requires employers with 15 or more employees to provide reasonable accommodation for Continue reading

Working to Reverse Autism in Children and Adults

 Research into reversing autism is in pre-clinical stages and is mostly carried out in rodents. To be successful, behavior therapies for autism have to be aggressive. Some pediatric neurologists suggests behavior therapies should run for about 20 plus hours per week for months if not years. Early detection is always key to have positive results. The average age of autism for a child is four years old. This is considered a late diagnosis and many of these children are not able to complete the required therapy during those early developmental Continue reading

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